The Western Circuit in Tanzania is famous for primate conservation including chimpanzees and Lake Tanganyika.

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GOMBE STREAMS NATIONAL PARK

Gombe is the smallest park in Tanzania, covering only 52 sq. km. Gombe offers visitors the chance to observe the chimpanzee communities made famous by British explorer Jane Goodall. A number of monkey species can also be spotted including red colobus, and red tail, and blue monkey species. The area is heavily forested making it an unsuitable habitat for carnivores and safe for walking safaris. Birdwatchers are richly rewarded with a trip to Gombe.

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LAKE TANGANYIKA

Lake Tanganyika is the longest lake (after Lake Baikal in Siberia), and the second deepest freshwater lake in the world. It contains one of the richest concentrations of fish found anywhere. More than 300 different species live within it.

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KATAVI NATIONAL PARK

Katavi is Tanzania’s third largest park. It is noted for its miombo woodland and is home to buffalo, herds of elephants, leopards, lions, and zebra. Water fools are abundant, with Lake Chala particularly rich in birdlife with over 400 species recorded. Katavi also boasts Tanzania’s greatest concentration of hippopotamus and crocodiles.

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MAHALE MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

Mahale is a sanctuary of the chimpanzee population, which is estimated to be 1,000. They may be observed in their natural habitat in groups of up to 30. The park's western boundary is the shore of Lake Tanganyika, the second deepest freshwater lake in the world with more than 250 different species of fish.

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UJIJI VILLAGE

A village close to Kigoma, Ujiji holds special historical significance. In 1858, Burton and Speke commenced their exploration of Lake Tanganyika and in 1871 Henry Stanley pronounced the famous words "Dr. Livingstone I presume." Two engraved plaques and small museums commemorate these events.